Her story is a haunting reminder of why
it should be illegal to chain
dogs
.
Storm was just 2 years old when she strangled to death at the end of her chain after being chained
up outdoors like a rusty old bicycle and left unsupervised.
After
calls about Storm’s horrific death flooded our office, PETA wrote to the mayor
of the town in which she died, Portsmouth, Virginia, asking him to introduce “Storm’s
Law,” an ordinance
that would ban or seriously restrict chaining.

Storm’s owners claim to suspect foul
play, but cruel people—who often poison or shoot dogs because they are annoyed
by their barking or steal them for use as “bait dogs” in dogfights
or to sell to laboratories
for experimentation—are only one of the many dangers that chained dogs face. Obviously,
Storm should have never been chained in her sad little mud patch to begin with.


PETA
receives hundreds of reports of chained dogs, like the one pictured here, every
year.

Dogs can strangle or injure themselves
when their chains become tangled, or they can be attacked by other animals. Often
deprived of food, water,
veterinary care, and shelter,
chained dogs routinely suffer from a range of maladies, including malnutrition,
dehydration, flea infestations, mange, and untreated injuries, and can freeze
to death or die of heatstroke.

And dogs aren’t the only ones who suffer
the ill effects of chaining. Subjecting a social pack animal to a life of
isolation contributes to aggressive behavior, making chained dogs three
times
as likely to bite.

More than 120 jurisdictions
have passed laws banning or restricting chaining. If, like Portsmouth, your
area still allows dogs to be chained, please use PETA’s tips
to get a chaining ordinance passed.

GD Star Rating
loading...

Article source: PETA Files

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *